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Medical Malpractice Lawyer

Scary Time for Students: College Health Centers Provide Inadequate Care

Millions of students are returning to college campuses in the middle of a worldwide pandemic. This will put to test the ability of college and university health services to adequately care for students.

“To access the landscape of student health services at roughly 1,700 four-year residential campuses, The Washington Post interviewed more than 200 students, parents and health officials and examined thousands of pages of medical records and court documents and 5,500 reviews of student health centers posted on Google.” (TheWashingtonPost)

Healthcare facilities on nationwide college campuses vary widely. Some may contain a single exam room, with one nurse who is not licensed to write prescriptions; another may have a multistory building with more comprehensive services.

Some students interviewed have been very happy with the care they received, while others have said there are major shortcomings.

“Student health centers are akin to the Wild West of medical care. There are no national regulations, and most are not licensed by states. Only about 220 campus medical clinics of the thousands nationwide are accredited by outside health organizations as meeting best practices.” (TheWashingtonPost)

This is a surprising statistic, and a scary one at a time when “many states are experiencing a surge of coronavirus cases, including an increasing number of young people who have tested positive.” Colleges are “ideal places for the novel coronavirus to spread quickly through shared dorm rooms, communal bathrooms and dining halls.”

Here are some of the findings of The Washington Post’s research.

In February 2019, Duke University student Rose Wong was having sharp pains in her abdomen. At the school’s health center, a nurse pressed on her stomach and told her it was gas. The nurse assured her everything was okay and sent her to the campus pharmacy for Gas-X. The next morning, Wong was feeling worse, and went to the emergency room. The doctor found that her kidney had a massive hemorrhage, which was later determined to be coming from a cancerous tumor. She went through surgery and chemotherapy, and was forced to miss an entire school year.

Wong is concerned about returning to school now. She worries that “the university and its medical clinic will be incapable of keeping her and 15,500 other…” students safe from COVID-19.

Research found other misdiagnoses, including a case of appendicitis at Kansas State University, and a case of meningitis at the University of Arkansas.

A student passed away in 2018 after adenovirus went around the campus of the University of Maryland. The student was immunocompromised, and the school health center never informed students about the outbreak. After her death, officials finally disclosed that dozens of students had been sickened by adenovirus.

The student’s father “fears that campus health centers across the country are woefully unprepared to handle the [coronavirus] pandemic. ‘How are they even going to possibly protect those kids?’ he questioned. ‘They could barely function when there is no crisis.’”

According to The Washington Post, “College health officials…are privately discussing insufficient stockpiles of personal protective equipment (PPE), inadequate access to coronavirus testing on campus and a short supply of rooms to quarantine students.” They are definitely not prepared.

Students have reported that in the past, they have sometimes had to wait days or weeks for an appointment to get be seen at a college health center. Some said they had been provided inadequate care, with some ending up hospitalized (some near-death) because of mistakes made at on-campus clinics.

There were also complaints that the clinics were too costly, forcing some students to forego treatment altogether.

Because of the pandemic, students at some four-year schools will have a harder time getting an appointment for in-person medical care. “Officials plan to lock the doors of campus clinics, refuse drop-in visits and shift many appointments to telemedicine,” to prevent the spread of the virus.

Other campus health centers do not have the resources to manage a significant outbreak.

Research shows that “in 2017, colleges on average spent only about $185 per student for their health centers…Nearly 70 percent of colleges surveyed did not have a full-time psychiatrist, and one-third did not have a full-time physician.”

Here in South Carolina, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Health is partnering with Clemson University and the College of Charleston, giving students “24/7 access to a health care provider through MUSC Health’s virtual urgent care…MUSC Health will supplement the care already provided by student health services by offering care when it wouldn’t otherwise be available – such as after-hours urgent care – and by offering more mental health services.” (web.musc.edu)

Additional links for South Carolina college students:

http://scdhec.gov/sites/default/files/media/document/DHEC_College_and_University_Guidance-7.10.20.pdf (DHEC COVID Guidance for SC Colleges and Universities)

University of South Carolina health services:

https://sc.edu/about/offices_and_divisions/student_health_services/index.php

Coastal Carolina University health services:

https://www.coastal.edu/health/

Furman University health services:

SC State University health services:

https://www.scsu.edu/studentaffairs/healthservices.aspx

CONTACT THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID L. HOOD FOR A FREE MEDICAL MALPRACTICE CONSULTATION

If you or someone you care about has suffered because of medical negligence, please schedule your free consultation by calling the Law Offices of David L. Hood at (843) 491-6025 or filling out our brief online contact form.

We know how difficult it can be to deal with the immediate and long-term effects of a serious malpractice-related injury. At the Law Offices of David L. Hood, we work hard to make things simple for you. After a free case evaluation, if we believe we can help you and your family, Medical Malpractice Attorney David L. Hood, co-counsel, and our team of experts will vigorously pursue your case to get you the best result we can achieve. Let us put our years of experience to work for you!

Other online resources used in this article:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/college-officials-address-the-quality-of-care-at-student-health-centers/2020/07/12/80c857d2-c053-11ea-b4f6-cb39cd8940fb_story.html

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Medical Malpractice Lawyer

Telehealth Expands Access to Healthcare During COVID-19 Pandemic

Prior to COVID-19, the use of telemedicine or telehealth was very minimal, and seemed more like a luxury. Many of us are under shelter in place orders due to the Coronavirus; and those who aren’t have been told to social distance, and stay away from people as much as possible, to keep the spread down.

“As clinicians seek new ways to serve patients and stem the rapid spread of the novel coronavirus in the United States, policymakers and insurers have looked to telemedicine or telehealth to provide care to patients in their homes.”(kff.org) Telemedicine has exploded across the United States in a few short weeks, after many years of slow growth, helping healthcare providers to continue responding to the needs of Americans who have COVID-19, and to those who just need to touch base on the status of their health.(healthcareitnews.com)

Dr. Ronan Factora, a geriatrician says there’s greater urgency for telemedicine during the pandemic because “we do not want to expose our older patients who are more vulnerable to its complications in the risk of illness.” (AARP.com)

What is Telemedicine?

Telemedicine “is commonly defined as the remote provision of health care services using technology to exchange information for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease.” Patients use basic communication tools, like phone calls, text messages, emails, or online portals to communicate with their doctor virtually. This way, the patient doesn’t have to actually go into the provider’s office for a visit; they can have a doctor’s visit right from home!

Telehealth visits can be used to:

  • Screen patients who have symptoms of COVID-19, then advise them.
  • Provide low-risk urgent care for non-COVID-19 conditions, then advise patient.
  • Recommend primary care providers and specialists for chronic health conditions.
  • Provide coaching and support for patients managing chronic health conditions.
  • Participate in therapy.
  • Monitor clinical signs of certain chronic medical conditions.
  • Engage in case management for patients who have difficulty accessing care (those with limited mobility, or in very rural settings).
  • Follow up with patients after a doctor visit or hospitalization.
  • Plan and counsel to document preferences for a life-threatening event or medical crisis.
  • Provide non-emergent care to patients in long-term care facilities. (CDC.gov)

What to expect in a telehealth visit:

The doctor will have your chart in front of him/her just like an in-person visit. The doctor will go through your medical history with you. Make sure you have paper and pen ready, so you can take notes. Depending on your symptoms, the doctor may have you take your temperature, measure your heart rate, and/or take your blood pressure (if you have a blood pressure monitor at home).

Limits to Telemedicine:

Michael Hochman, MD says, “You’re definitely limited as to what you can do, compared with a physical exam. But you can tell a lot about a patient by how they look. Are they breathing hard? Do they look like they are in distress? 90 percent of a diagnosis is observation and taking a careful history.” Of course, the other 10%, things like listening to your heart or lungs, or feeling your abdomen can’t be accomplished through a virtual visit.

If you are in South Carolina, and are in need of a telemedicine visit, the Medical University of South Carolina can help. The website (MUSCHealth.org) states: “If you are concerned about coronavirus (COVID-19) or experiencing respiratory or flulike symptoms such as fever and/or cough, MUSC recommends you speak to an online virtual care provider. Virtual COVID-19 screenings are free. Just use the code COVID19 when you log in. Online care on your schedule by MUSC doctors and providers you know and trust! No appointment. No wait. Accessible 24/7 for the whole family.”

CONTACT THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID L. HOOD FOR A FREE MEDICAL MALPRACTICE CONSULTATION

If you or someone you care about has suffered because of medical negligence, please schedule your free consultation by calling the Law Offices of David L. Hood at (843) 491-6025 or filling out our brief online contact form.

We know how difficult it can be to deal with the immediate and long-term effects of a serious malpractice-related injury. At the Law Offices of David L. Hood, we work hard to make things simple for you. After a free case evaluation, if we believe we can help you and your family, Medical Malpractice Attorney David L. Hood, co-counsel, and our team of experts will vigorously pursue your case to get you the best result we can achieve. Let us put our years of experience to work for you!

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Medical Malpractice Lawyer

Where are All the Non COVID-19 Emergencies?

Many emergency rooms have seen a huge increase in patients with fever, cough, shortness of breath, and other signs of possible pneumonia stemming from COVID-19 lately.

“However, ER physicians have also noticed a startling decrease in patients coming in for serious non-COVID issues, such as heart attack and stroke.” (Forbes.com) Because of the “Stay at home” orders during this pandemic, it’s understandable that there would be less accidents, injuries, etc., thus some drop in ER volume.

But, where are all the patients with inflamed appendixes, bowel obstructions, heart attack symptoms, stroke symptoms, and infected gall bladders? They are nowhere to be found, and it’s very unlikely that there has suddenly been a decline in these types of cases.

In a Gallup online poll taken between March 28 and April 2, people with different conditions were asked if they needed treatment at a doctor’s office or emergency room right now, how concerned would they be that they may be exposed to the coronavirus. 86% of heart disease patients said they would be either “very concerned” or “moderately concerned.” The figure was 83% for patients with high blood pressure.

Doctors are worried that “the pandemic has produced a sub-epidemic of people who need care at hospitals but dare not come in.” (WashingtonPost.com) People are worried about going to the hospital and being exposed to COVID-19, because as we’ve all heard, people with other health conditions who contract COVID-19, have an increased risk of serious complications.

Here are some interesting statistics:

“MUSC (Medical University of South Carolina), a major stroke center, averaged 550 calls per month over the past four months about possible stroke patients from the 45 to 50 emergency rooms that refer patients. But it has seen just 100 in the first half of April, said Alex Spiotta, director of neurovascular surgery. Phone calls from patients to MUSC’s telestroke program dropped from as many as 20 daily to about nine in mid-April.”

At the University of Miami-Jackson Memorial Comprehensive Stroke Center, between February and March, stroke patients went down almost 30%.

A recent NRC study (National Research Corporation) found that “53% of consumers have delayed care for themselves or someone in their household during COVID-19, and 60% of consumers think there is an elevated risk when visiting their providers.” (ThinkReviveHealth.com)

A Second Health Crisis?

Is there a second health crisis looming, that will appear once the Coronavirus is finally on the decrease? Will this take place due to patients delaying necessary medical care, with conditions that are nonurgent at the time, but because of the delay, become life-threatening?

This is exactly what Dr. Evert Eriksson, trauma medical director at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) fears will happen. He says too many patients are “trying to tough it out at home, fearful about going to the hospital because of the virus.” For example, he’s seeing many patients coming to the hospital with ruptured appendix, whereas previously they would have gone to the ER before the rupture took place. He says 70% of patients presenting with appendicitis right now are “late presentations.”

One patient in his 20’s ignored the increasing pain in his stomach, only using over-the-counter painkillers. By the time he finally went to the ER, “he had developed a large abscess, that was gnawing through the muscle in his abdominal wall.” Had he gone to the hospital 10 days earlier he would have needed a fairly routine surgery, and maybe a one-night stay in the hospital. Instead he had a lengthy and difficult stay in the hospital. Doctors had to operate, and then use antibiotics to control the widespread infection before they could even begin to address the appendix itself. Dr. Eriksson said, “That’s going to be a wound-care challenge for him moving forward.” The patient had said he held off because he was scared of contracting COVID-19 at the hospital.

Chris Kwolek, a vascular surgeon has also seen an increase in patients that are waiting to go to the hospital. He said when people have problems with circulation in their feet and legs, and put off getting care, Dr. Kwolek has to resort to amputation, being unable to restore blood flow at that point.

Megan Stobart-Gallagher, an emergency physician states, “Patients who come in with non-COVID-19 stuff are dying at higher rates.” This is because they are waiting so long before seeking medical attention. He notes that a 15-year-old patient who presented with pneumonia died within 24-hours of arriving at the hospital. (Inquirer.com) Pneumonia is an unusual cause of death for a patient that young.

What are health professionals doing to help prevent the next health crisis?

Cardiologist reports showing a recent sudden drop in heart attack patients spurred the American Heart Association to “launch a new media campaign, urging people to call for help at the first signs of heart attack or stroke.”

Some cardiologists are checking in with patients through telemedicine visits. The American College of Cardiology launched a “Cardiosmart” campaign, reassuring patients and encouraging those with symptoms to call 911 for urgent care and to continue with medical care through telemedicine when possible.

Hospitals are protecting patients by requiring all staff to wear masks, increasing cleanings, and separating patients with symptoms. They are doing all they can to inform their local communities that their ER’s are safe, and “to reassure patients that they have the appropriate equipment, expertise, and protocols to keep all patients safe — both those with COVID-19 and those without.”

One group of hospitals issued flyers stating, “If you are having an emergency, we are ready to care for you.”

With heart attacks and strokes, every minute counts. Any small delay in seeking medical care could cause more permanent damage. William A. Gray, a cardiologist says the major message for heart patients has to be staying home during a heart attack or heart failure is not a good place to be.

Dr. Harlan M. Krumholz says, “People with chronic conditions need to know that avoidance of needed care could ultimately be as big a threat as the virus itself.” (ReachMD.com)

CONTACT THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID L. HOOD FOR A FREE MEDICAL MALPRACTICE CONSULTATION

If you or someone you care about has suffered because of medical negligence, please schedule your free consultation by calling the Law Offices of David L. Hood at (843) 491-6025 or filling out our brief online contact form.

We know how difficult it can be to deal with the immediate and long-term effects of a serious malpractice-related injury. At the Law Offices of David L. Hood, we work hard to make things simple for you. After a free case evaluation, if we believe we can help you and your family, Medical Malpractice Attorney David L. Hood, co-counsel, and our team of experts will vigorously pursue your case to get you the best result we can achieve. Let us put our years of experience to work for you!

Other online resources used for this article:

https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/v74a54/even-people-without-coronavirus-are-getting-sicker-right-now

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Single Mother of Brain-Damaged Boy Wins $50 M in Malpractice Suit

Poor communication at hospitals can cause medical negligence that leads to injuries and sometimes disabilities.

Ms. Snow can now afford to have her 5-year-old son live back home with her, where he belongs. In November of 2019, a jury deliberated six hours before awarding her son and his mom $50 million.

Ms. Snow says she went into West Suburban Medical Center, Oak Park, Illinois, on August 16, 2014 at 34-weeks pregnant, in a panic, because she had noticed her baby was no longer moving, and was worried that something was wrong.

The nurses initiated fetal monitoring, but ignored signs that the baby in utero was being starved of oxygen. They never called a doctor. An ultrasound was done, and showed the baby was not moving. Still, no doctor was called.

After six hours, a doctor was finally called in, and an emergency C-section was performed. But it was too late. Little Gerald had been starved of oxygen for way too long, and was born with permanent severe brain damage. He was born not breathing, limp and pale, and had to be resuscitated.

“The jury found the hospital staff failed to call a doctor and ignored the baby’s oxygen levels for six hours – causing Gerald to be born with brain damage.” (Chicago.CBSLocal.com)

Now, at 5-years-old, Gerald cannot speak, cannot walk, and cannot even sit up on his own. He has to be taken care of 24 hours a day by his mom and medical staff.

He can smile and squeal. His mother says, “He’s the bright light of everybody’s lives…All he does is smile and laugh.”

Snow said she took care of her son for four years, when it got to the point that she could no longer afford to stay at home and take care of him. She took him to “Misericordia Home, a facility that helps provide care for people with mild to severe developmental disabilities.”

After the verdict, Snow can now bring her son home, and will be able to afford to take care of him. “He will now be able to come back to live with me at home. He’s all I got and I’ve got to go to him now and tell him that everything will be all right.” (ChicagoSunTimes.com)

“We have waited a long time for this day,” she said. “Even though Gerald can’t talk in the same way as us, I wanted his voice to be heard.” (6ABC.com)

Contact the Law Offices of David L. Hood for a Free Medical Malpractice Consultation

If you or someone you care about has suffered because of medical negligence, please schedule your free consultation by calling the Law Offices of David L. Hood at (843) 491-6025 or filling out our brief online contact form.

We know how difficult it can be to deal with the immediate and long-term effects of a serious malpractice-related injury. At the Law Offices of David L. Hood, we work hard to make things simple for you. After a free case evaluation, if we believe we can help you and your family, Medical Malpractice Attorney David L. Hood, co-counsel, and our team of experts will vigorously pursue your case to get you the best result we can achieve. Let us put our years of experience to work for you!

Other online resources used for this article:

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/mother-of-brain-damaged-boy-wins-us-101m-in-malpractice-suit-1.4673097?cache=%3FclipId%3D89680

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Here’s How a Medical Malpractice Lawsuit Works in South Carolina

If you’ve been harmed by a doctor or other medical professional in South Carolina and you’re trying to decide whether you want to pursue a medical malpractice case against them, you’re probably wondering what will happen if you decide to do so. 

To help you understand what’s involved, clear up any misconceptions, and relieve your natural anxiety over the unknown, we’ve created a basic outline of what a medical malpractice lawsuit looks like so you know what to expect. In this article, we’ll outline the five primary steps involved in filing a medical malpractice lawsuit and explain each one.

If you’re not sure whether you are a victim of medical malpractice or medical negligence, read our recent blog article on this subject for more help.

Step One: Get a Free Initial Case Review from a Medical Malpractice Attorney

There are some types of lawsuits that people may be able to handle on their own without help from an attorney, but a medical malpractice suit isn’t one of them. These cases are very complex and require the attorney to gather lots of medical evidence, get testimony from expert medical witnesses, and negotiate with large insurance companies who have their own experienced legal teams.

Fortunately, you should be able to get an initial review of your case from an experienced medical malpractice lawyer without having to pay anything or sign any agreement. Your lawyer should also handle your case on a contingent fee basis, which means you won’t pay anything unless your lawyer gets you compensation through a settlement or verdict at trial.

At the Law Offices of David L. Hood, we always offer free initial consultations with no strings attached for medical malpractice cases. During this time, we’ll listen to your story and advise you about your legal rights and options. We also represent medical malpractice clients on a contingent fee basis. That means you won’t pay any attorney’s fees or case expenses unless we achieve a financial recovery in your case.* This is the least we can do since many medical malpractice victims are suffering financially as well as physically and emotionally when they come to see us.

Of course, you may want to speak with or meet with multiple lawyers before you commit to one, and there’s nothing wrong with that. A medical malpractice case can be a long and complicated journey, and you should feel confident in your lawyer’s credentials, resources, attitude, and professionalism.

From this point on, the steps in a medical malpractice case may sound complex and intimidating, but your attorney should be able to guide you through them and offer informed advice at every step.

Step Two: Investigating Your Case and Reviewing the Medical Evidence

Your lawyer will need to get a complete and accurate picture of your health and your medical conditions, both before and after the incident that harmed you. They’ll want to sit down for an in-depth conversation with you about your medical history, and they’ll also contact your doctors to obtain all your medical records.

Most people don’t realize how complicated it is to gather and organize a person’s complete medical history, especially if they’ve recently received lots of treatment (which is usually the case for medical malpractice victims). This process involves lots of time and paperwork, and it can take months of hard work.

After this in-depth investigation and review, your lawyer should be able to give you a more informed assessment of your case’s strengths and weaknesses and advise you about whether you should go forward. While your lawyer should have reviewed your case during an initial consultation, they will now have a much more accurate picture of the evidence and your medical history. This is the time for them — and you — to make a final determination about how to proceed.

Step Three: Hiring Expert Medical Witnesses

If your lawyer thinks they can prove that you were the victim of medical negligence and that this negligence caused you harm, they’ll seek out and hire medical experts who can testify to this in court.

Often, your attorney will hire doctors who specialize in the same area of medicine as the medical professional who harmed you. These experts can review the negligent person’s conduct and explain exactly how it deviated from accepted standards of practice.

RELATED: What Happens When the Pharmacy Gives You the Wrong Medication?

While it’s impossible to successfully file a medical malpractice lawsuit without testimony from medical experts, these experts don’t work for free, and their fees often add up to thousands upon thousands of dollars.

Fortunately, your attorney should cover these costs as part of your case expenses. Depending on where you live and which attorney you work with, you may have to pay these expenses later even if you don’t win your case. But when you work with the Law Offices of David L. Hood, you only have to pay case expenses if we achieve a financial recovery in your case.*

Step Four: Negotiating With the Insurance Company

Now that your lawyer has secured expert medical witnesses, they’ll put together all the evidence. Using all the facts in the case, they will negotiate with the doctors’ and/or hospitals’ insurance companies to see if they will offer you a fair settlement that meets your financial needs and addresses the losses you’ve suffered.

While the insurance company may have made you an initial settlement offer, it was probably far too low and wouldn’t have come close to paying for your medical bills, lost wages, future medical expenses, and pain and suffering. However, now that your lawyer has gathered extensive medical evidence and hired witnesses with strong credentials, the insurance company may take your case more seriously and may decide to make you a fair offer.

In most medical malpractice cases, though, your lawyer will have to file a lawsuit and begin preparing for trial before the insurance company will make a serious settlement offer, and many medical malpractice cases do end up going all the way to trial.

Pre-Trial Part One: Discovery

You may have heard of the discovery phase of a lawsuit before. This is the part of the legal process where each side learns what the other side plans to argue in court and what evidence they’ll present. The discovery process usually involves lots and lots of documents, requests, and paperwork going back and forth between the two sides with the judge mediating the process.

During the discovery process, you will probably have to attend a deposition where the attorneys for the other side will ask you lots of questions. Your lawyer should be with you every step of the way before, during, and after the deposition. They should help you prepare and understand what to expect beforehand, and they should be there to protect your rights and advise you during the deposition itself.

A deposition can be a stressful process for a medical malpractice victim, but if your lawyer knows how to handle the process, it’s nothing to be afraid of. This is your chance to tell your side of the story on the record, and you should have the two most important assets on your side: an experienced lawyer and the truth.

Pre-Trial Part TwoNegotiation and Mediation

Before the trial begins, your attorney will talk one more time with the lawyers from the other side and see if they’re ready to offer you a fair settlement. In some cases, this part of the process might also involve mediation, which is where the attorneys from both sides work with a professional mediator to try and settle the case.

If negotiations go nowhere and mediation doesn’t work, then your lawyer will take your case to trial.

Step Five: A Medical Malpractice Trial

Compared to the very long build-up that often takes more than a year, the trial itself will be a quicker process. Most medical malpractice trials last from two to four weeks, although some can be shorter or longer. Your trial also may not go forward on the originally-scheduled date; it’s common for trials to get rescheduled, sometimes multiple times.

While the trial is a very involved process, your attorney should be doing all the heavy lifting at this point. Your lawyer will have put in lots of work to prepare for the trial, and they’ll be working very hard during the trial. But the trial shouldn’t be a difficult or stressful process for you. You may have to testify in court if the defense calls you as a witness, but your attorney will prepare you for this if it happens.

Just because your case has gone to trial doesn’t mean a settlement is out of the question. The other side can still make settlement offers, and if they decide to make a fair offer that will address your losses and create a stable financial situation for you, then you and your attorney may decide to take it, which will end the trial.

If the other side never makes a fair offer, then your attorney will continue to argue on your behalf in court and present evidence, and then it will be up to the jury to decide what happens.

However, even after the jury’s decision, the case isn’t necessarily over. The losing side may still be able to file an appeal, which will delay payment of any damages until the appeal is resolved.

Contact the Law Offices of David L. Hood If You’ve Been Harmed by Medical Negligence or Medical Malpractice in South Carolina

A medical malpractice lawsuit can be a very complicated process, but that doesn’t mean you should ever have to feel stressed out or overwhelmed. You deserve justice and fair compensation for the harm you’ve suffered. At the Law Offices of David L. Hood, we, our co-counsel, and our team of experts will fight for you during every step of a medical malpractice claim so you can focus on your health and well-being with the confidence that your case is in good hands.

If you or someone you care about has suffered because of medical negligence, please schedule your free consultation by calling the Law Offices of David L. Hood at (843) 491-6025 or filling out our brief online contact form. We handle all medical malpractice cases on a contingent fee basis so you won’t pay any fees or expenses unless we make a financial recovery in your case.* Let Attorney David L. Hood put his years of experience to work for you!

*Clients are not liable for any expenses, unless there is a recovery in their case; however, if there is a recovery in their case, clients will be liable for expenses. Attorney’s fees are based on a percentage of the recovery, which will be computed before deducting expenses.

The content provided here is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice on any subject.